11 thoughts on “Shhhhh…

  1. brandi

    Snorting laughter here…Betsy tweets slay me. Dad, she can’t possibly be THAT obnoxious and snarky. Does she really hate being touched and snuggled?

    1. Keithius

      Yes, Betsy really does hate being touched and snuggled (by anyone but Gus). Except for very rare occasions, when the stars line up just right, and she’s tired, and can’t be bothered moving, she MIGHT just let you pat her gently on the head, from a safe distance, for a little while. MAYBE.

      But she never likes snuggling; never has and I don’t think she ever will.

  2. Codi

    How does your dad keep you guys from chewing those yummy baseboards?! That is the first thing my buns go for as soon as they come out! I would love to give them more freedom but they are too fast to chew. They have tons of wooden toys in their enclosure, as well as hay and treats so it’s not that they don’t have other outlets for chewing. They also LIKE the taste of bitter apple, so they chew worse when I use that. They will stay away from dove soap, but I am worried about using that on my walls.

    Any ideas?
    Codi

    1. Keithius

      To stop unwanted chewing, the only thing that’s worked for us is training – which we usually do by careful discipline. Usually, this is just saying “no!” and pushing them away from the thing they shouldn’t be chewing (or picking them up – which they hate – and putting them down elsewhere).

      It’s time consuming and you have to be on high-alert for a long time, but if you have something they don’t like, and you’re very consistent with how you discipline (they need to associate doing the bad thing with the discipline they get), but eventually, over time, it does seem to work… or, at least it has for us.

      Gus and Betsy never chewed the baseboards, but they did used to chew our table and chair legs, and get on the couch and chew the cushions… and now, finally, they don’t do that anymore.

      I don’t know if this would work with everybunny, but it worked with ours. It took forever, but they eventually learned what not to do.

      1. Codi

        Thanks for the suggestions. I have tried that with our boy, Paul, and he gets it, but discipline seems to make our Liz want to do it more. Also, if you tell her “no” or clap or pick her up, she stomps and sometimes tries to kick you. She has never been a very friendly rabbit even though we have been very diligent about handling her since we got her at 1 month old. Having her fixed helped some, but she still doesn’t enjoy human company very much.

        We’ll keep working with them. Maybe as they get older they’ll chew a little less (they are 5 and 4.5 yrs old right now).

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